Monthly Archives: December 2016

Check Your Stored Garlic Now!

Garlic that was harvested in the summer and stored for winter use should be looked over now!  Garlic bulbs start to sprout as spring approaches. 
Discard any soft bulbs and set out any with green tips.   We roast any garlic that shows the smallest signs of green shoots.  Once the bulbs begin green shoots, the rest will quickly follow.  Roasting is a great way to store longer.  

Remove any green shoots off the cloves, drizzle with some olive oil, sprinkle with a bit of sea salt.  Roast in the oven at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until soft.  

Put them back into storage!  Once garlic is cool, slip the cloves out of their skin and place into a clean sealable jar and cover with olive oil.  Cover tightly.  Adding a sprig of thyme or rosemary adds more flavor.  Use the sweet-tasting cloves to flavor soups, stews or use in artisan breads (my favorite)

Sprouting Garlic

Sprouting Garlic

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Growing Brussels Sprouts at Home

As with all vegetables, Brussels sprouts taste better grown at home.  These miniature cabbage looking sprouts are a delight for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners as well as a tasty side dish during winter months.

Pick a spot with plenty of sun, minimum of 8 hours each day.

Brussels sprouts require fertilizer, hummus-rich soil, so dig in plenty of well rotted compost in prior to sowing in the spring.   If your soil is acidic, sprinkle in agriculture lime, or if your soil is alkaline, add a small amount of sulfur.  Brussels sprouts prefer a pH of 6.5 – 7.5.

You can start sowing seed in mid-March to mid-April .  Sow thinly to a depth of 1/2″.  Once your little sprouts have reached 2-3″ tall, thin them to 2 to 2 1/2′  apart to allow them plenty of growing space.  As they grow you can draw the soil in around the base to give them support in the wind.  Compost can also be used to place around the plants rather than drawing soil up.  By using compost, it helps add nutrients as well as suppress weeds through the growing season.  Extra tall plants may need additional staking.   Keep the soil evenly moist, but never soggy.

Once Brussels sprouts have reached 6″ tall add some general fertilizer around the base of each plant.  Fertilizing every six weeks through the growing season.

Brussels sprouts general take 36 weeks from sowing.  So by patient!   Pick the buttons from the bottom of the stalk upward when they are about 1″, or the size of a cherry tomato.  They are sweeter after a frost.  The top leaves of the plant can also be cooked.

If you have problems with clubroot, lime your soil if it’s acidic.  Place collars around the base of each plant, or cover with insect netting to protect from cabbage root fly.  Cabbage white caterpillars will feed happily on leaves of Brussels sprouts, so protect early with lightweight row cover or spray with Bt once butterflies are present.

DSC_0032.jpgGreat taste in the kitchen:

Brussels Sprouts with Cheese & Walnuts

Stem Brussels sprouts till just tender then place them in a grill pan.  Sprinkle cheese over the top and grill till cheese has melted.  Add chopped walnuts, and black pepper to taste.

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