March

March can be an exciting and very busy month for gardeners!  

We have a list of things to help you get started. Of course you may have to adjust to your growing area, as we are all different. We are in zone 8. 

Sowing and Growing

A lot of seed can be sown in March, but keep a good eye on the weather. Snow and cold winds will put gardeners on hold and it’s usually worth waiting for better conditions. If its to cold outside, then wait before sowing into outdoor beds or start seeds in pots. These can go into a cold frame or even under sheltered areas or tunnels. Choose seeds that don’t need added heat and be prepared to look after small plants until weather allows you to plant them out. Many vegetable varieties are at a cross over point, meaning you can plant either by seeds or transplants.  

Sow Now

Beets, leeks, celeriac, Brussels sprouts, peas, broad beans, lettuce, parsnips, salad leaves, spinach, summer cabbage, cauliflower and turnips.  

Plant Now

Onion plants, shallots, early potatoes, peas, lettuce, spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, bok choy, leeks.

Keep plants frost free. Cover newly planted onion and potato leaves because they can be killed by frost if they emerge in cold weather. New onions can bolt if they are hit by a hard freeze.

Make mulch your best friend this year! Mulch holds in moisture, helps prevent weeds and helps cool roots when the hot summer sun comes. Start to Mulch between rows of established plants in the vegetable garden and perennial gardens. 

Mulch asparagus beds

While they are still dormant, it’s the ideal time to give them a final clean through in readiness for the new spears that appear in coming months. Carefully remove any weeds along the rows, taking care not to disturb the shallow roots or new shoots that are only a few inches below the surface. When weed free, apply a good thick mulch of garden compost, composted manure or mushroom compost over the bed. Ideally, it should be around 2 inches deep or even a little more. This will help seal in the moisture through the growing season, keep the soil in good, fertile condition and smother any weeds. 

Plant New Strawberry Plants

You will often see pots of strawberry plants for sale in March. These may already have open flowers or they may have small buds, or just show promise of later flowers with some healthy foliage.  Be picky and look for the strongest plants that you can. Strawberries do well with some good garden compost dug into the bed.  Scatter kelp meal, and bone meal into the bed and slightly work in. If your soil is alkaline, using an Acid Mix fertilizer may be a better choice of plant food. We don’t use manure, as we find we get more leaf and fewer fruits. Mulch to keep the soil moist and weeds down. If birds are an issuer you may want to cover with floating row cover or Bird-X

1 Comment

Filed under Gardening

One response to “March

  1. Katrice Schimbeck

    Thanks, Ali! There’s some good info in here I needed.

    On Wed, Mar 10, 2021 at 1:09 PM Out Standing In The Garden wrote:

    > Ali posted: ” March can be an exciting and very busy month for gardeners! > We have a list of things to help you get started. Of course you may have > to adjust to your growing area, as we are all different. We are in zone 8. > Sowing and Growing A lot” >

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